Sharon Osbourne’s tests confirm two genes linked to Alzheimer’s

Reality television star and wife of musician Ozzy Osbourne, Sharon Osbourne, announced recently she had some genetic testing done several months ago and is unsettled by the results. According to her genetic analysis conducted by a university in England, Sharon has two of four genes linked to Alzheimer’s disease. SEE ALSO: What do horses have to do with Alzheimer’s? “They test every single cell, chromosome and gene in your body; it’s like a DNA test but a million times more sophisticated,” she told the Daily Record. “The results showed I have two of the four genes that give it to you. They’re not the two major genes, but they’re still there and I have them.” Though it was not made known which genes Sharon Osbourne’s test came back positive for, the Alzheimer’s Association indicates there are a number of genes associated with Alzheimer’s but three variations that are most commonly associated with late-onset Alzheimer’s disease. These variations are from the APOE gene, a gene everyone is given two copies of, one from their mother and one from their father. APOE is broken down into several variations: APOE e2, APOE e3 and APOE e4. Genes APOE e2 and APOE e4 are linked to an increased risk for Alzheimer’s, but APOE e4 is the most common genetic variant found among patients. Individuals with one copy of APOE e4 have an increased risk for Alzheimer’s, but not as high of a risk as someone who inherited two copies of APOE e4. The APOE gene isn’t the only gene associated with this form of degenerative brain disease. The Mayo Clinic indicates advancing research has linked at least five other genes to late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, including SORL1, CLU, CR1, PICALM, and TREM2. None of these genes have been definitively identified as a cause of Alzheimer’s, only an increased risk for the condition. “I was terrified because my dad died from Alzheimer’s,” Sharon said in the interview. “It is the most soul-destroying disease. To see someone you love come down with it… it’s wicked, it really is. There is nothing I can do to prevent it, nothing. People say to take cod liver oil and do puzzles and things, but then I look at people diagnosed with dementia. My father was super active mentally, and take Margaret Thatcher, Ronald Reagan… they were all so active, and that’s what really frightens me.” Just as there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, there is no way to 100 percent prevent the condition as an individual ages. SEE ALSO: What yellow spice may help treat Alzheimer’s? The National Institute on Aging indicates what the scientific community does know is that maintaining a healthy lifestyle—one that includes a healthy diet, physical activity, appropriate weight, and no smoking—can maintain and improve overall health and well-being. Making healthy choices can ward off a number of chronic diseases, including Alzheimer’s.The post Sharon Osbourne’s tests confirm two genes linked to Alzheimer’s appeared first on Voxxi.

Sharon Osbourne says she has two genes linked to Alzheimer’s disease. (DFree/Shutterstock)

Reality television star and wife of musician Ozzy Osbourne, Sharon Osbourne, announced recently she had some genetic testing done several months ago and is unsettled by the results.

According to her genetic analysis conducted by a university in England, Sharon has two of four genes linked to Alzheimer’s disease.

SEE ALSO: What do horses have to do with Alzheimer’s?

“They test every single cell, chromosome and gene in your body; it’s like a DNA test but a million times more sophisticated,” she told the Daily Record. “The results showed I have two of the four genes that give it to you. They’re not the two major genes, but they’re still there and I have them.”

Though it was not made known which genes Sharon Osbourne’s test came back positive for, the Alzheimer’s Association indicates there are a number of genes associated with Alzheimer’s but three variations that are most commonly associated with late-onset Alzheimer’s disease.

These variations are from the APOE gene, a gene everyone is given two copies of, one from their mother and one from their father.

Research requires grants
Science is coming closer to understanding how genetics impacts Alzheimer’s risk. (Shutterstock)

APOE is broken down into several variations: APOE e2, APOE e3 and APOE e4. Genes APOE e2 and APOE e4 are linked to an increased risk for Alzheimer’s, but APOE e4 is the most common genetic variant found among patients.

Individuals with one copy of APOE e4 have an increased risk for Alzheimer’s, but not as high of a risk as someone who inherited two copies of APOE e4.

The APOE gene isn’t the only gene associated with this form of degenerative brain disease. The Mayo Clinic indicates advancing research has linked at least five other genes to late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, including SORL1, CLU, CR1, PICALM, and TREM2.

None of these genes have been definitively identified as a cause of Alzheimer’s, only an increased risk for the condition.

“I was terrified because my dad died from Alzheimer’s,” Sharon said in the interview. “It is the most soul-destroying disease. To see someone you love come down with it… it’s wicked, it really is. There is nothing I can do to prevent it, nothing. People say to take cod liver oil and do puzzles and things, but then I look at people diagnosed with dementia. My father was super active mentally, and take Margaret Thatcher, Ronald Reagan… they were all so active, and that’s what really frightens me.”

Just as there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, there is no way to 100 percent prevent the condition as an individual ages.

SEE ALSO: What yellow spice may help treat Alzheimer’s?

The National Institute on Aging indicates what the scientific community does know is that maintaining a healthy lifestyle—one that includes a healthy diet, physical activity, appropriate weight, and no smoking—can maintain and improve overall health and well-being.

Making healthy choices can ward off a number of chronic diseases, including Alzheimer’s.

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The post Sharon Osbourne’s tests confirm two genes linked to Alzheimer’s appeared first on Voxxi.