How legal supplement ‘MMS’ caused 7 children to be placed in protective care

Seven children are in protective custody after investigators found Mineral Miracle Solution (MMS) in their home following an anonymous call to child services. Parents Hal and Michelle Stanley are under suspicion of giving the supplement to their children, though Hal told authorities he is the only one who has used it personally and keeps it around primarily for water purification in the garden. SEE ALSO: FDA warns against using caffeine powder The supplement was discovered during a premise search after an initial complaint about the Stanleys allowing their children to run outside in the snow barefoot, something Michelle Stanley told Health Impact News was “a tradition to briefly run out in the snow barefoot and take a picture of the footprints.” In an email to the media, Mrs. Stanley explained how shocked she was that, after being told the claims against them were declared false, the Department of Human Services (DHS) ended up taking their children away for something she didn’t know was considered dangerous. Mineral Miracle Solution is not FDA-approved, and the government organization has issued a number of warnings about the product and children. In the eyes of the authorities, having MMS in the home meets the definition of child endangerment. There’s just one catch: Mineral Miracle Solution is completely legal in the United States. It lacks FDA approval because no nutritional supplements are required to have FDA approval to be sold commercially as long as they make no definitive claims to cure or treat a specific condition. “They said the charge was that we had a poisonous substance in our house and that the kids were being exposed to it and it endangered their welfare,” Michelle said in the email. “The substance named in the report was MMS and we would have gladly given it to them without a search warrant because we knew nothing of the dangers of it from all our research. It is sold on line as a water purifier and we are “preppers” so there is nothing unusual about us having it in our house.” MMS and its legality appear to be a grey area when it comes to the FDA. In 2010 a press announcement was released on the product, warning consumers that when taken as directed it could cause serious negative health consequences. “The product instructs consumers to mix the 28 percent sodium chlorite solution with an acid such as citrus juice. This mixture produces chlorine dioxide, a potent bleach used for stripping textiles and industrial water treatment. High oral doses of this bleach, such as those recommended in the labeling, can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and symptoms of severe dehydration,” reads the FDA warning. “MMS claims to treat multiple unrelated diseases, including HIV, hepatitis, the H1N1 flu virus, common colds, acne, cancer, and other conditions. The FDA is not aware of any research that MMS is effective in treating any of these conditions. MMS also poses a significant health risk to consumers who may choose to use this product for self-treatment instead of seeking FDA-approved treatments for these conditions.” SEE ALSO: Wart removers pose fire hazard, warns FDA The FDA indicated they would continue to investigate and “may pursue civil or criminal enforcement actions as appropriate to protect the public from this potentially dangerous product.” Those criminal and civil enforcement actions never occurred, however, and MMS has remained on the market for legal sale. The Stanley children are still not in the custody of their parents, who, though no formal charges have been levied against them yet, are under continuing investigation. The situation has caused a national and international stir, causing many Stanley advocates to compare the incident to a progression of the U.S. into a “police state.” :The post How legal supplement ‘MMS’ caused 7 children to be placed in protective care appeared first on Voxxi.

The FDA warns consumers not to take MMS as directed. (Shutterstock)

Seven children are in protective custody after investigators found Mineral Miracle Solution (MMS) in their home following an anonymous call to child services.

Parents Hal and Michelle Stanley are under suspicion of giving the supplement to their children, though Hal told authorities he is the only one who has used it personally and keeps it around primarily for water purification in the garden.

SEE ALSO: FDA warns against using caffeine powder

The supplement was discovered during a premise search after an initial complaint about the Stanleys allowing their children to run outside in the snow barefoot, something Michelle Stanley told Health Impact News was “a tradition to briefly run out in the snow barefoot and take a picture of the footprints.”

In an email to the media, Mrs. Stanley explained how shocked she was that, after being told the claims against them were declared false, the Department of Human Services (DHS) ended up taking their children away for something she didn’t know was considered dangerous.

Mineral Miracle Solution is not FDA-approved, and the government organization has issued a number of warnings about the product and children. In the eyes of the authorities, having MMS in the home meets the definition of child endangerment.

There’s just one catch: Mineral Miracle Solution is completely legal in the United States.

It lacks FDA approval because no nutritional supplements are required to have FDA approval to be sold commercially as long as they make no definitive claims to cure or treat a specific condition.

“They said the charge was that we had a poisonous substance in our house and that the kids were being exposed to it and it endangered their welfare,” Michelle said in the email. “The substance named in the report was MMS and we would have gladly given it to them without a search warrant because we knew nothing of the dangers of it from all our research. It is sold on line as a water purifier and we are “preppers” so there is nothing unusual about us having it in our house.”

MMS and its legality appear to be a grey area when it comes to the FDA. In 2010 a press announcement was released on the product, warning consumers that when taken as directed it could cause serious negative health consequences.

Plants need water to grow
Mr. Stanley told the authorities he used MMS primarily to treat the water used in his garden. (Shutterstock)

“The product instructs consumers to mix the 28 percent sodium chlorite solution with an acid such as citrus juice. This mixture produces chlorine dioxide, a potent bleach used for stripping textiles and industrial water treatment. High oral doses of this bleach, such as those recommended in the labeling, can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and symptoms of severe dehydration,” reads the FDA warning. “MMS claims to treat multiple unrelated diseases, including HIV, hepatitis, the H1N1 flu virus, common colds, acne, cancer, and other conditions. The FDA is not aware of any research that MMS is effective in treating any of these conditions. MMS also poses a significant health risk to consumers who may choose to use this product for self-treatment instead of seeking FDA-approved treatments for these conditions.”

SEE ALSO: Wart removers pose fire hazard, warns FDA

The FDA indicated they would continue to investigate and “may pursue civil or criminal enforcement actions as appropriate to protect the public from this potentially dangerous product.”

Those criminal and civil enforcement actions never occurred, however, and MMS has remained on the market for legal sale.

The Stanley children are still not in the custody of their parents, who, though no formal charges have been levied against them yet, are under continuing investigation. The situation has caused a national and international stir, causing many Stanley advocates to compare the incident to a progression of the U.S. into a “police state.”

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The post How legal supplement ‘MMS’ caused 7 children to be placed in protective care appeared first on Voxxi.