Experts: ‘Don’t take Gwyneth Paltrow’s vagina advice’

Actress Gwyneth Paltrow has a lot of followers and fans when it comes to her healthy living blog “Goop,” but sometimes experts indicate the 42-year-old celebrity doesn’t always get it right when she makes recommendations. Such is the case when Paltrow recently recommended followers enjoy a v-steam, which is a spa-designed steam cleaning of the vagina and uterus. SEE ALSO: A new source of antibiotics found in…vaginal bacteria? “The real golden ticket here is the Mugworth V-Steam: You sit on what is essentially a mini-throne, and a combination of infrared and mugwort steam cleanses your uterus, et al,” she wrote on her blog. “It is an energetic release—not just a steam douche—that balances female hormone levels. If you’re in LA, you have to do it.” Female health experts aren’t so enthusiastic about the idea of a v-steam, however. Dr. Amos Grunebaum, an ob-gyn at New York Presbyterian Hospital, told the Daily News the risks far outweigh any benefits for this particular procedure, and worst-case scenario could even result in a person’s death. There have been a handful of reported cases where too much air or water pressure in the vagina has been deadly, and what’s more, steam could potentially migrate to the fallopian tubes or abdominal cavity, causing illness or miscarriages if a woman is pregnant. Paltrow isn’t the only celebrity to show interest in the v-steam. The reality TV show Tia & Tamera, which follows grown-up stars Tia and Tamera Mowry, showed the twins having a spa day during which they both experienced a v-steam. According to the Korean history behind the procedure, it is supposed to fight infection, reduce stress, promote fertility, and ease PMS. Western doctors aren’t sold on the benefits though, stating there is virtually no research behind the practice and too much research on how douching in any form can be bad for a woman’s health. Douching, or the practice of washing out the vagina, upsets the natural balance of bacteria and can result in an increased risk for infection. It has also been linked to an increased risk for cervical cancer and pelvic inflammatory disease. SEE ALSO: 7 ways to remedy vaginal dryness “If you want to feel relaxed get a good massage — if you want to relax your vagina, have an orgasm,” blogged Dr. Jen Gunter, a California ob-gyn who specializes in vulvovaginal disorders. “Mugwort or wormwood or whatever when steamed, either vaginally or on the vulva, can’t possibly balance any reproductive hormones, regulate your menstrual cycle, treat depression, or cure infertility Even steamed estrogen couldn’t do that.”The post Experts: ‘Don’t take Gwyneth Paltrow’s vagina advice’ appeared first on Voxxi.

Actress Gwyneth Paltrow attends the premiere of ‘Contagion’ during the 68th Venice Film Festival on September 3, 2011 (Photo: Shutterstock)

Actress Gwyneth Paltrow has a lot of followers and fans when it comes to her healthy living blog “Goop,” but sometimes experts indicate the 42-year-old celebrity doesn’t always get it right when she makes recommendations.

Such is the case when Paltrow recently recommended followers enjoy a v-steam, which is a spa-designed steam cleaning of the vagina and uterus.

SEE ALSO: A new source of antibiotics found in…vaginal bacteria?

“The real golden ticket here is the Mugworth V-Steam: You sit on what is essentially a mini-throne, and a combination of infrared and mugwort steam cleanses your uterus, et al,” she wrote on her blog. “It is an energetic release—not just a steam douche—that balances female hormone levels. If you’re in LA, you have to do it.”

Female health experts aren’t so enthusiastic about the idea of a v-steam, however.

Dr. Amos Grunebaum, an ob-gyn at New York Presbyterian Hospital, told the Daily News the risks far outweigh any benefits for this particular procedure, and worst-case scenario could even result in a person’s death.

There have been a handful of reported cases where too much air or water pressure in the vagina has been deadly, and what’s more, steam could potentially migrate to the fallopian tubes or abdominal cavity, causing illness or miscarriages if a woman is pregnant.

Paltrow isn’t the only celebrity to show interest in the v-steam. The reality TV show Tia & Tamera, which follows grown-up stars Tia and Tamera Mowry, showed the twins having a spa day during which they both experienced a v-steam.

According to the Korean history behind the procedure, it is supposed to fight infection, reduce stress, promote fertility, and ease PMS.

Spas do steam facials.
Steam baths may be good for the outside of the body, but the inside of the body is a different story. (Shutterstock)

Western doctors aren’t sold on the benefits though, stating there is virtually no research behind the practice and too much research on how douching in any form can be bad for a woman’s health.

Douching, or the practice of washing out the vagina, upsets the natural balance of bacteria and can result in an increased risk for infection. It has also been linked to an increased risk for cervical cancer and pelvic inflammatory disease.

SEE ALSO: 7 ways to remedy vaginal dryness

“If you want to feel relaxed get a good massage — if you want to relax your vagina, have an orgasm,” blogged Dr. Jen Gunter, a California ob-gyn who specializes in vulvovaginal disorders.

“Mugwort or wormwood or whatever when steamed, either vaginally or on the vulva, can’t possibly balance any reproductive hormones, regulate your menstrual cycle, treat depression, or cure infertility Even steamed estrogen couldn’t do that.”

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The post Experts: ‘Don’t take Gwyneth Paltrow’s vagina advice’ appeared first on Voxxi.