Financial Aid Author Kristina Ellis Helps Students Graduate Debt Free

NASHVILLE, Tenn.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Financial aid author and national scholar Kristina
Ellis
, known for her expertise in the world of college scholarships,
is sharing her wisdom on strategic financial planning in amazon.com%2FHow-Graduate-Debt-Free-Strategies-NotGoingBroke%2Fdp%2F1617957437%2Fref%3Dsr_1_1%3Fie%3DUTF8%26qid%3D1470683923%26sr%3D8-1%26keywords%3Dhow%2Bto%2Bgraduate%2Bdebt%2Bfree&esheet=51398428&newsitemid=20160809005500&lan=en-US&anchor=HOW+TO+GRADUATE+DEBT+FREE%3A+THE+BEST+STRATEGIES+TO+PAY+FOR+COLLEGE&index=2&md5=3d9a1d9bf7a115afcd0586b33c80cc8f” rel=”nofollow”>HOW
TO GRADUATE DEBT FREE: THE BEST STRATEGIES TO PAY FOR COLLEGE

(Aug. 9, 2016;
Worthy
Publishing
; ISBN: 978-1617957437).

Lacking financial support upon high school graduation, Ellis devised a
plan that enabled her to secure more than $500,000 in scholarships and
grants, and graduate from Vanderbilt University and receive a master’s
degree from Belmont University, all debt free. In HOW
TO GRADUATE DEBT FREE
, Ellis, author of the bestselling Confessions
of a Scholarship Winner
, takes her dedication to helping others find
the success and financial freedom she found a step further. In this
book, she guides readers through a step-by-step process on how to plan,
save and graduate free of crippling debt.

Covering everything from how to save money and earn college credit
before attending a university, to securing financial aid and maximizing
your investment, she covers it all including:

  • Where to Put Your Money. 529 plans, Coverdell education savings
    accounts, Roth IRAs … she helps parents understand where to invest
    their money.
  • Securing scholarships … take it from her, the expert. She
    wrote Confessions of a Scholarship Winner prior to this book,
    and she graduated from Vanderbilt University on scholarship money
    alone.
  • Pay as You Go. Ellis discusses a range of manageable job
    options students can consider as a means of earning and saving money
    while also balancing their school workload.
  • Student Assets. Money in a student’s bank account is counted
    against a student at a rate of 20 percent. Be mindful about savings
    and consider how it could affect your financial aid eligibility.
  • College ROI. Consider a school far beyond its “prestige
    factor.” Students should focus on the net price, four-year completion
    rate and their future earning potential.

Ellis’s fresh take on paying for college encourages readers to make a
plan and get ahead as soon as possible to create a path to graduating
debt free. Her relatable and candid take on the topic creates practical
and inspiring steps for students and parents wanting to avoid the
treacherous road of student loan debt.

Contacts

Choice Media & Communications
Maggie Rheney, 731-394-2139
Maggie@ChoicePublicity.com