Mexico & the Americas pay homage to Chespirito

[ione_media_gallery id=”329812″ overlay=”true”] Flanked by thousands of children dressed up in “Chapulin Colorado” costumes, Roberto Gomez Bolaños’s casket entered Mexico City’s Azteca stadium in a procession for an homage that was attended by thousands and watched by millions on television around Latin America and the United States on Sunday. SEE ALSO: Chespirito dies at 85 The late Mexican comedian immortalized the boy character “El Chavo del Ocho,” which defined a generation for millions of Latin American children, as well as superhero “El Chapulin Colorado.”  He died at age 85 on Friday from heart problems. Florinda Mesa, his longtime wife, who also played Doña Florinda and Popis in his “El Chavo del Ocho,” tearfully led the ceremonies at the stadium that also included a mass. He created, wrote for and acted dozens of characters, which propelled him as a comedic genius. Since the 60’s he had been acting on television, but it wasn’t until the 70’s that he entered the golden years of his career. Despite this, he kept producing his sketch show well into the 80’s, keeping legions of kids and kids at heart entertained with his slapstick humor that could soften even the most jaded of souls. The mass appeal of his characters marked a milestone for Mexican television. Working almost a lifetime for broadcast TV giant Televisa, Chespirito was the first to put Mexican television production on the international map–with his show being broadcast abroad in most of Latin America. This paved the way for Mexican telenovelas that have become one of the staple exports of Mexican TV abroad. In the United States the SIN network–what would eventually become Univision–aired his episodes, and nowadays continues airing its reruns on its other networks, making it one of the most watched series of Spanish TV reruns. Univision’s flagship programming on Saturday nights, “Sabado Gigante,” was put on hold in order to air a retrospective of his career, including varied clips of a tribute show put on for him by Televisa when he was 82-years-old. It was a presage to his failing health, as he sat in the front of the theater with an oxygen tank, displaying limited mobility.   Sunday Chespirito’s body left from Televisa’s San Angel TV studios on a float adorned by flowers and life-size statues of some of the characters he played. It was a chance for the residents of Mexico City who couldn’t make it to the stadium to pay their last respects. Thousands of people at the stadium said goodbye to the iconic comedian who took his inspiration from Laurel and Hardy as well fellow Mexican transcendent comedian Cantinflas. “Chespirito! Chespirito!” shouted fans of all ages as his coffin entered the stadium. It was twice as significant because this stadium is considered a shrine to soccer, and Bolaños was a big fan of the sport. The service was televised on Mexican television, as well as on cable in the United States. Giant television screens showed videos about his life and characters. His morning show was a staple for preschoolers, much like “Captain Kangaroo” in the United States. “More agile than a turtle, stronger than a mouse, nobler than a lettuce, his coat of arms is a heart,” were the lines read by “El Chapulin Colrado’s” announcer during the show’s opening in Spanish. The character’s name would translate to “The Crimson Grasshopper!” in English. President Enrique Peña Nieto posted on Twitter on Friday, “Mexico has lost an icon whose work has transcended generations and borders.” Maria Laredo, 86, and her 48-year-old daughter Angelica Herrera attended the ceremony. “He touched many generations. My mother liked him, I liked him and even my 3-year-old grandson liked him,” the daughter told The Associated Press. Many of the red t-shirts worn by fans said: “Thank you for making us laugh.” SEE ALSO: ‘El Chapulin Colorado’ cartoon to debut in 2015 A final funeral service closed to the public will be held Monday before he is laid to rest. In addition to his wife, Chespirito is survived by six children from a previous marriage, as well as 12 grandchildren. A funeral mass was also held Saturday night at Televisa’s facility. You can watch clips from the ceremony here: [ione_embed src=//www.youtube.com/embed/np4p632cqB8 service=youtube width=640 height=450 type=iframe]  The post Mexico & the Americas pay homage to Chespirito appeared first on Voxxi.

[ione_media_gallery id=”329812″ overlay=”true”]

Flanked by thousands of children dressed up in “Chapulin Colorado” costumes, Roberto Gomez Bolaños’s casket entered Mexico City’s Azteca stadium in a procession for an homage that was attended by thousands and watched by millions on television around Latin America and the United States on Sunday.

SEE ALSO: Chespirito dies at 85

The late Mexican comedian immortalized the boy character “El Chavo del Ocho,” which defined a generation for millions of Latin American children, as well as superhero “El Chapulin Colorado.”  He died at age 85 on Friday from heart problems. Florinda Mesa, his longtime wife, who also played Doña Florinda and Popis in his “El Chavo del Ocho,” tearfully led the ceremonies at the stadium that also included a mass.

He created, wrote for and acted dozens of characters, which propelled him as a comedic genius. Since the 60’s he had been acting on television, but it wasn’t until the 70’s that he entered the golden years of his career.

Despite this, he kept producing his sketch show well into the 80’s, keeping legions of kids and kids at heart entertained with his slapstick humor that could soften even the most jaded of souls.

In this undated photo released by the television network Televisa on Friday, Nov. 28, 2014, Mexican comedian Roberto Gomez Bolanos known as Chespirito poses for a photo as his famous character El Chapulin Colorado. According to Televisa, where he worked, the famed comedian died Friday. He was 85. (AP Photo/Televisa)

The mass appeal of his characters marked a milestone for Mexican television. Working almost a lifetime for broadcast TV giant Televisa, Chespirito was the first to put Mexican television production on the international map–with his show being broadcast abroad in most of Latin America. This paved the way for Mexican telenovelas that have become one of the staple exports of Mexican TV abroad.

In the United States the SIN network–what would eventually become Univision–aired his episodes, and nowadays continues airing its reruns on its other networks, making it one of the most watched series of Spanish TV reruns.

Univision’s flagship programming on Saturday nights, “Sabado Gigante,” was put on hold in order to air a retrospective of his career, including varied clips of a tribute show put on for him by Televisa when he was 82-years-old. It was a presage to his failing health, as he sat in the front of the theater with an oxygen tank, displaying limited mobility.

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Sunday Chespirito’s body left from Televisa’s San Angel TV studios on a float adorned by flowers and life-size statues of some of the characters he played. It was a chance for the residents of Mexico City who couldn’t make it to the stadium to pay their last respects.

Thousands of people at the stadium said goodbye to the iconic comedian who took his inspiration from Laurel and Hardy as well fellow Mexican transcendent comedian Cantinflas.

“Chespirito! Chespirito!” shouted fans of all ages as his coffin entered the stadium. It was twice as significant because this stadium is considered a shrine to soccer, and Bolaños was a big fan of the sport. The service was televised on Mexican television, as well as on cable in the United States.

Giant television screens showed videos about his life and characters. His morning show was a staple for preschoolers, much like “Captain Kangaroo” in the United States.

“More agile than a turtle, stronger than a mouse, nobler than a lettuce, his coat of arms is a heart,” were the lines read by “El Chapulin Colrado’s” announcer during the show’s opening in Spanish. The character’s name would translate to “The Crimson Grasshopper!” in English.

President Enrique Peña Nieto posted on Twitter on Friday, “Mexico has lost an icon whose work has transcended generations and borders.”

Maria Laredo, 86, and her 48-year-old daughter Angelica Herrera attended the ceremony.

“He touched many generations. My mother liked him, I liked him and even my 3-year-old grandson liked him,” the daughter told The Associated Press.

Many of the red t-shirts worn by fans said: “Thank you for making us laugh.”

SEE ALSO: ‘El Chapulin Colorado’ cartoon to debut in 2015

A final funeral service closed to the public will be held Monday before he is laid to rest.

In addition to his wife, Chespirito is survived by six children from a previous marriage, as well as 12 grandchildren.

A funeral mass was also held Saturday night at Televisa’s facility. You can watch clips from the ceremony here:

[ione_embed src=//www.youtube.com/embed/np4p632cqB8 service=youtube width=640 height=450 type=iframe]

The post Mexico & the Americas pay homage to Chespirito appeared first on Voxxi.