Should you be drinking bone broth?

Bone broth is an ancient health remedy still used around the world today. In fact, it is a practice gaining in popularity in both public and celebrity circles. But is there really a benefit to drinking bone broth, and just what, exactly, is it doing for the body? The purported health benefits of drinking bone broth extend from improving digestion to perking up skin appearance, and enough people believe in the ancient elixir that chic New York City venders are selling bone broth for upwards of $9 a cup. SEE ALSO: Best natural remedies for arthritis “People are becoming disenchanted by our convenience-focused fast-food culture. These foods may be easy, but they don’t nourish our bodies,” Melissa Hartwig, co-founder of the Whole30 challenge, told Yahoo Health. “Homemade bone broth is chock full of nutrients missing or under-represented in today’s modern diet. It’s an excellent source of minerals like calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and potassium, in forms that your body can easily absorb.” Much of the lure associated with bone broth goes back to humanity’s roots; research shows primitive humans heated bones to extract the fat content, a much needed component of their diets. This makes bone broth wildly popular among people who follow versions of the Paleo diet, a regime that abides by the rule: “If a caveman didn’t eat it, neither should you.” Dieticians who champion drinking bone broth do so because of the nutrients supposedly contained within the beverage. Bone broth contains collagen, gelatin, hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, glycosamino glycans, proline, glycine, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and potassium, substances the body uses for processes involving joints, bones, ligaments and tendons, digestion, inflammation-reduction, skin and hair. And while it may be true that a glass of bone broth gives you a good dose of micronutrients needed in the body, some experts say the home remedy is overrated. According to a report from Business Insider, many of the ingredients that people claim make bone broth a miracle substance are actually already found in the standard American diet. What’s more, an excess of many of these nutrients–like collagen and glycine–means the body simply eliminates unneeded quantities. There is one potentially sound reason to drink bone broth, however. According to research, the gelatin found in bone broth may help provide relief from certain digestive ailments. Gelatin coats and protects the lining of the intestines, and in rodent studies promotes the regeneration of damaged tissue. “It’s (bone broth) rich in glycine and proline, amino acids not found in significant amounts in muscle meat (the vast majority of the meat we consume),” said Hartwig. “These amino acids are important for a healthy gut and digestion.” SEE ALSO: 7 natural foods to relieve s stomach ache on-the-go It is important to note that, despite the success of rodent studies, no human trials have been conducted to verify bone broth’s health benefits in the digestive system. Individuals should consult with their doctor before adding bone broth to a diet plan if any pre-existing medical conditions exist. Bone broth can have a high calorie count, and should not be seen a weight-loss aid.The post Should you be drinking bone broth? appeared first on Voxxi.

Bone broth has a lot of rumored health benefits and is selling for $9+ a glass in NYC. (Shutterstock)

Bone broth is an ancient health remedy still used around the world today. In fact, it is a practice gaining in popularity in both public and celebrity circles. But is there really a benefit to drinking bone broth, and just what, exactly, is it doing for the body?

The purported health benefits of drinking bone broth extend from improving digestion to perking up skin appearance, and enough people believe in the ancient elixir that chic New York City venders are selling bone broth for upwards of $9 a cup.

SEE ALSO: Best natural remedies for arthritis

“People are becoming disenchanted by our convenience-focused fast-food culture. These foods may be easy, but they don’t nourish our bodies,” Melissa Hartwig, co-founder of the Whole30 challenge, told Yahoo Health. “Homemade bone broth is chock full of nutrients missing or under-represented in today’s modern diet. It’s an excellent source of minerals like calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and potassium, in forms that your body can easily absorb.”

Much of the lure associated with bone broth goes back to humanity’s roots; research shows primitive humans heated bones to extract the fat content, a much needed component of their diets. This makes bone broth wildly popular among people who follow versions of the Paleo diet, a regime that abides by the rule: “If a caveman didn’t eat it, neither should you.”

Dieticians who champion drinking bone broth do so because of the nutrients supposedly contained within the beverage. Bone broth contains collagen, gelatin, hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, glycosamino glycans, proline, glycine, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and potassium, substances the body uses for processes involving joints, bones, ligaments and tendons, digestion, inflammation-reduction, skin and hair.

And while it may be true that a glass of bone broth gives you a good dose of micronutrients needed in the body, some experts say the home remedy is overrated.

Slow cookers make easy meals
Bone broth is made by slow-cooking soup bones. (Shutterstock)

According to a report from Business Insider, many of the ingredients that people claim make bone broth a miracle substance are actually already found in the standard American diet. What’s more, an excess of many of these nutrients–like collagen and glycine–means the body simply eliminates unneeded quantities.

There is one potentially sound reason to drink bone broth, however. According to research, the gelatin found in bone broth may help provide relief from certain digestive ailments. Gelatin coats and protects the lining of the intestines, and in rodent studies promotes the regeneration of damaged tissue.

“It’s (bone broth) rich in glycine and proline, amino acids not found in significant amounts in muscle meat (the vast majority of the meat we consume),” said Hartwig. “These amino acids are important for a healthy gut and digestion.”

SEE ALSO: 7 natural foods to relieve s stomach ache on-the-go

It is important to note that, despite the success of rodent studies, no human trials have been conducted to verify bone broth’s health benefits in the digestive system. Individuals should consult with their doctor before adding bone broth to a diet plan if any pre-existing medical conditions exist. Bone broth can have a high calorie count, and should not be seen a weight-loss aid.

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The post Should you be drinking bone broth? appeared first on Voxxi.