Is Naya Rivera right about her ‘showering too often’ theory?

Puerto Rican beauty Naya Rivera caught some grief after making comments on “The View” this week. The television star light-heartedly stated she felt white people showered far more frequently compared to other ethnicities; her husband, who is white, showers multiple times a day, she explained. “I have to say I have a theory about showering, [which] is that I think that white people shower a lot more than ethnics,” Rivera commented during the show. “I feel like showering more than once a day or every day is such a white people thing.” SEE ALSO: Just how many germs do we swap French kissing? Rivera’s comment wasn’t received well by other non-white viewers, who complained over social media such a comment suggested ethnic individuals were less clean or less hygienic compared to white people. Misrepresenting Latinos and other ethnicities? “When YOU tell the world YOU shower every 3 days that says more about YOU not us Naya Rivera; somethings are better left unsaid,” commented one viewer via Twitter. Rivera immediately tried to explain herself, stating, “But I can say that I am now married to a white man, and he showers a lot. Like, a lot — two, three times a day. I’m like, ‘What are you doing?’ A study says… a dermatologist says you are only supposed to shower once or twice every three days, so I’m right on the mark.” Despite the fact Naya Rivera’s comments landed her in hot water with fans and regardless of what her own personal habits might be, a growing body of research suggests less may be more when it comes to whole-body cleansing. Over the last few years, experts have made significant discoveries in relation to the human microbiome, the millions of microscopic organisms that live in and on the human body. Not only are most of these organisms harmless to a healthy individual, they are beneficial. Some organisms, like those studied by University of California San Fransisco Michael Fischbach and his team, create their own versions of antibiotics that help protect against dangerous pathogens. Other research, this time conducted by the biotech company AOBiome, looked at how washing the face daily actually removes beneficial bacteria, contributing to acne and other inflammatory conditions like diabetic ulcers. Bacteria known as ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) is an important component in sweat, but it found almost everywhere in the environment, aiding the nitrogen cycle and nitrification process. AOB acts to combat the process of inflammation by removing excess ammonia, thus relaxing blood vessels , speeding wound healing and balancing the microbiome on the skin’s surface. Excessive washing, especially with harsh soaps and cleaners can strip the body of these beneficial microorganisms. What’s more, the scientific community has only begun to investigate what all the microbes on and in the human body do, so there is not telling just how much harm we actually do by following traditional hygiene standards. SEE ALSO: The one thing you never thought might cure acne Of course, the presence and benefits of the human microbiome are no reason to go the opposite end of extreme and forgo all washing and cleanliness. Not washing at all can allow an overgrowth of bacteria. Just as there are beneficial microbes, there are still dangerous ones, and even some of the good ones can become harmful if they grow out of control. As for Naya Rivera, she responded to critics by telling everyone to “lighten up.”  The post Is Naya Rivera right about her ‘showering too often’ theory? appeared first on Voxxi.

Naya Rivera might not be so wrong about her ‘showering’ comments. (DFree/ Shutterstock)

Puerto Rican beauty Naya Rivera caught some grief after making comments on “The View” this week. The television star light-heartedly stated she felt white people showered far more frequently compared to other ethnicities; her husband, who is white, showers multiple times a day, she explained.

“I have to say I have a theory about showering, [which] is that I think that white people shower a lot more than ethnics,” Rivera commented during the show. “I feel like showering more than once a day or every day is such a white people thing.”

SEE ALSO: Just how many germs do we swap French kissing?

Rivera’s comment wasn’t received well by other non-white viewers, who complained over social media such a comment suggested ethnic individuals were less clean or less hygienic compared to white people.

Misrepresenting Latinos and other ethnicities?

“When YOU tell the world YOU shower every 3 days that says more about YOU not us Naya Rivera; somethings are better left unsaid,” commented one viewer via Twitter.

Rivera immediately tried to explain herself, stating, “But I can say that I am now married to a white man, and he showers a lot. Like, a lot — two, three times a day. I’m like, ‘What are you doing?’ A study says… a dermatologist says you are only supposed to shower once or twice every three days, so I’m right on the mark.”

Despite the fact Naya Rivera’s comments landed her in hot water with fans and regardless of what her own personal habits might be, a growing body of research suggests less may be more when it comes to whole-body cleansing.

Over the last few years, experts have made significant discoveries in relation to the human microbiome, the millions of microscopic organisms that live in and on the human body. Not only are most of these organisms harmless to a healthy individual, they are beneficial. Some organisms, like those studied by University of California San Fransisco Michael Fischbach and his team, create their own versions of antibiotics that help protect against dangerous pathogens.

Showering can be relaxing
Could showering frequently disrupt your beneficial human microbiome? (Shutterstock)

Other research, this time conducted by the biotech company AOBiome, looked at how washing the face daily actually removes beneficial bacteria, contributing to acne and other inflammatory conditions like diabetic ulcers. Bacteria known as ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) is an important component in sweat, but it found almost everywhere in the environment, aiding the nitrogen cycle and nitrification process. AOB acts to combat the process of inflammation by removing excess ammonia, thus relaxing blood vessels , speeding wound healing and balancing the microbiome on the skin’s surface.

Excessive washing, especially with harsh soaps and cleaners can strip the body of these beneficial microorganisms. What’s more, the scientific community has only begun to investigate what all the microbes on and in the human body do, so there is not telling just how much harm we actually do by following traditional hygiene standards.

SEE ALSO: The one thing you never thought might cure acne

Of course, the presence and benefits of the human microbiome are no reason to go the opposite end of extreme and forgo all washing and cleanliness. Not washing at all can allow an overgrowth of bacteria. Just as there are beneficial microbes, there are still dangerous ones, and even some of the good ones can become harmful if they grow out of control.

As for Naya Rivera, she responded to critics by telling everyone to “lighten up.”

(function(d, s, id) {

var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];

if (d.getElementById(id)) return;

js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;

js.src = “//connect.facebook.net/en_GB/sdk.js#xfbml=1&appId=313098648827735&version=v2.0”;

fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);

}(document, “script”, “facebook-jssdk”));

The post Is Naya Rivera right about her ‘showering too often’ theory? appeared first on Voxxi.