A half-finished goal

A half-finished goal

Republicans can leave Tampa satisfied, since in three days they were able to humanize their presidential candidate and establish a narrative that ended up incomplete due to the lack of details about the platform of former Gov. Mitt Romney.

Much attention was paid from day one until the very end to showing another side of Romney, seeking to counteract the image of a cold, calculating plutocrat who is disconnected from the reality of Americans-an image that has been widely publicized in Democratic ads. The emotional message of the GOP candidate achieved this purpose.

But that’s just part of the narrative that unfolded in Tampa for four days, pointing out that President Obama had the opportunity to fix the country and failed. Now it’s the turn of a successful businessman, a “fix it all” type, so he can solve everything. The narrative ended with the Reaganistic optimism of “waking up in America.”

Now that the convention is over, the problem is they still haven’t said how they’ll achieve these goals.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said the first night that there would be talk of tough decisions and that leadership isn’t getting people to love you but telling the truth, even if painful. What was expected never happened.

Some will say that the party’s platform includes how the Republican would govern, although those close to Romney dismissed the document’s importance too many times for it to serve as a guide.

From the podium, there were reasonable criticisms of the Obama administration-along with half-truths and shameless lies-like the perception that the White House doesn’t have a pro-business focus. Being anti-Obama isn’t enough to win the election.

Romney’s campaign plan is to go around the country emphasizing the message of job creation. It’s a strategy in keeping with the times and the concerns, but for it to work, what is needed is something much more specific than not being a bad person and believing in the future.