Why are more and more women shaving their faces?

There is a movement in the world of female beauty and it has nothing to do with facial hair. More and more women are picking up the habit of shaving their faces–just like men do–and it is with the intent to keep their skin healthier and wrinkle-free. SEE ALSO: Skin care: How to get rid of acne scars “It’s definitely a thing,” Alexis Wolfer, editor of The Beauty Bean, told Good Morning America. “One reason men are thought to get fewer wrinkles is that they’re constantly exfoliating their faces every time they shave, literally shaving away the outermost layers of skin and encouraging your skin to create new layers.” Shaving at home is the milder version of a professional process called dermaplaning, where the topmost layers of the skin are shaved away to reveal healthier layers beneath. In a doctor’s office, dermaplaning occurs on a deeper level, and is used to treat issues like acne scars, but at home, shaving can achieve similar results over a matter of time. “Dermaplaning is just a very simple physical or mechanical method of exfoliation, which helps to remove dead skin cells and give your face a brighter complexion,” Dr. Elizabeth Hale told The Cut. “And since it removes some vellus hairs [the baby-fine hairs on your face], it can make the skin feel smoother. But I think it also taps into this whole new field in dermatology which is all about increasing efficacy and penetration of topical ingredients.” The job of the skin is to keep out foreign substances, and it makes sense that the outermost layers are the toughest. By eliminating these layers, topical treatments used to benefit the skin (like moisturizers, etc) can become more readily absorbed. As for the concern that shaving will make hairs grow in thicker, experts indicate that is just a myth. Women who have fine facial hair have little to worry about, though women with darker facial hair may need to practice caution. Once shaved, dark facial hair will grow in with a blunt end, making it appear darker. SEE ALSO: Skin care: Tip to banish winter skin blues “Let me make something clear and hopefully answer your questions once and for all: I shave my face as a method of exfoliating my skin,” said reality TV star Caroline Manzo, who was one of the first women seen shaving on television. “I don’t shave because I have a hairy face! I’ve been practicing this for over 10 years, and I haven’t grown any facial hair because of it, and I have beautiful skin with minimal wrinkles. I think this should clarify any questions,” she told Reality Tea. Though shaving is catching on as a healthy skin trick, many skin care experts want women to know that it’s the exfoliation that is important, not necessarily how it gets done. For women with sensitive skin, shaving can result in razor burn. A gentler alternative, such as a sugar scrub, would be a better choice for these individuals.The post Why are more and more women shaving their faces? appeared first on Voxxi.

Why women shaving their faces Is now a thing. (Shutterstock)

There is a movement in the world of female beauty and it has nothing to do with facial hair. More and more women are picking up the habit of shaving their faces–just like men do–and it is with the intent to keep their skin healthier and wrinkle-free.

SEE ALSO: Skin care: How to get rid of acne scars

“It’s definitely a thing,” Alexis Wolfer, editor of The Beauty Bean, told Good Morning America. “One reason men are thought to get fewer wrinkles is that they’re constantly exfoliating their faces every time they shave, literally shaving away the outermost layers of skin and encouraging your skin to create new layers.”

Shaving at home is the milder version of a professional process called dermaplaning, where the topmost layers of the skin are shaved away to reveal healthier layers beneath. In a doctor’s office, dermaplaning occurs on a deeper level, and is used to treat issues like acne scars, but at home, shaving can achieve similar results over a matter of time.

“Dermaplaning is just a very simple physical or mechanical method of exfoliation, which helps to remove dead skin cells and give your face a brighter complexion,” Dr. Elizabeth Hale told The Cut. “And since it removes some vellus hairs [the baby-fine hairs on your face], it can make the skin feel smoother. But I think it also taps into this whole new field in dermatology which is all about increasing efficacy and penetration of topical ingredients.”

The job of the skin is to keep out foreign substances, and it makes sense that the outermost layers are the toughest. By eliminating these layers, topical treatments used to benefit the skin (like moisturizers, etc) can become more readily absorbed.

As for the concern that shaving will make hairs grow in thicker, experts indicate that is just a myth. Women who have fine facial hair have little to worry about, though women with darker facial hair may need to practice caution. Once shaved, dark facial hair will grow in with a blunt end, making it appear darker.

Exfoliating can make skin healthier
For women with sensitive skin, exfoliation alternatives should be considered. (Shutterstock)

SEE ALSO: Skin care: Tip to banish winter skin blues

“Let me make something clear and hopefully answer your questions once and for all: I shave my face as a method of exfoliating my skin,” said reality TV star Caroline Manzo, who was one of the first women seen shaving on television. “I don’t shave because I have a hairy face! I’ve been practicing this for over 10 years, and I haven’t grown any facial hair because of it, and I have beautiful skin with minimal wrinkles. I think this should clarify any questions,” she told Reality Tea.

Though shaving is catching on as a healthy skin trick, many skin care experts want women to know that it’s the exfoliation that is important, not necessarily how it gets done. For women with sensitive skin, shaving can result in razor burn. A gentler alternative, such as a sugar scrub, would be a better choice for these individuals.

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The post Why are more and more women shaving their faces? appeared first on Voxxi.